Posts Tagged Semantic web

Aid Transparency Barcamp: Linked data and Semantic Web Technologies for Aid Transparency

Just came back from the Aid Transparency Barcamp, Kathmandu. I had a talk on Linked data and Semantic Web Technologies for Aid Transparency. It was a mixed group of audience, with both developers and non-technical people. I guess that the presentation was a bit too much for the non-technical side (sorry for that :-P).
There are many things in the slides, so sharing them here for everyone’s reference. The developers may play with the tools and datasets. Perhaps someone could use Tim’s linked data and demonstrate some interesting app. (Thanks Tim ;-))

Some major questions/concerns from the audience –
* This seems too technical, does the user need to understand all this? (No)
* What will the user see as linked data, web pages? or something different? (ya basically web pages, but driven by data from different linked sources)

But most importantly,
* What problem does linked data address? (Thanks Simon for helping me answer this .. you can put complex queries which need data from across various sources, further you can reuse/link to existing data and similarly others can reuse/link to your data)
Towards the end Simon pointed out that we still need small concrete example applications (in aid transparency) to really convince people (at different levels) to provide (linked) open data, not just demos or visualizations. Agree.
Perhaps the developers/industry can build something really useful for some stakeholder to prove the potential of linked open data.

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PhD final defense presentation

Feel quite free after finishing the final defense for my PhD  🙂  (July 27, 2009 @ NII, Tokyo)

It went quite smoothly. Thanks to the evaluation committee for constructive comments. And it was nice to have a good number of interested audience. Thank you all for coming!

Here are the slides for my presentation, in case useful to anyone. The thesis is all about information sharing anyway 😉

presentation slides

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RDF Semantics in Japanese

Good news for Japanese Semantic Web researchers or Japanese people interested in the Semantic Web. Seiji Koide from the National Institute of Informatics, Tokyo has translated the entire W3C RDF semantics specification, which is the one of the foundations of Semantic Web, into Japanese! It is available at the following link.

http://www-kasm.nii.ac.jp/~koide/RDFSemantics-J.htm

This would be a great contribution for the Japanese people having a hard time trying to understand the specifications in English. It is even harder to translate and use  those terminologies properly while doing research in Japanese and explaining them to the Japanese communities. Great job 😉

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Social Web Incubator Group

Social Web Incubator Group

Good to see the Social Web incubator group charter. Great start! Harry Halpin had talked about it when he visited Tokyo and had a meeting with some W3C members here along with prof. Hideaki Takeda and I from NII.  I feel that a group like this can play a very important role in identifying and addressing practical challenges that are still hindering the adoption of open semantic standards in the social web. While movements like Data portability, SIOC and FOAF have been very successful in the Semantic Web world, many issues like privacy, authentication, ownership, security, trust etc should still be addressed if such standards are to be publicly accepted. Otherwise, people feel safe and comfortable within walled data gardens while social web companies prefer to hold their customers and their data.

The mission of the Social Web Incubator Group, part of the Incubator Activity, is to explore the development of open standards for social data portability built on existing W3C standards and standards developed by the community, and to promote these solutions within the W3C.

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Presenting the social Semantic Web to Nepali Engineers in Japan

Yesterday I presented my paper titled “Information Sharing on the Social Semantic Web” in the Second NEA-JC Workshop on Current and Future Technologies. NEA-JC stands for Nepal Engineers’ Association – Japan Chapter. I made a general introduction to the social web and the Semantic Web, with the general audience from all backgrounds in mind. The paper has been written for non-technical audience. I am glad to see the interest shown by all in this area.

In general people understand what is the social web as there are many example sites many of them are actually using today. However, people find it hard to imagine what the Semantic Web is really like. There are rarely any sites that ordinary people are really using that could be used to cite examples of Semantic Web technologies. People are not satisfied by just understanding the vision and principles of the Semantic Web. People want to see the Semantic Web but its still hard to show to non-technical people.

I hope in the near future we will also have enough Semantic Web sites, just like the social or Web 2.0 sites today, so that people really see, understand and benefit from the Semantic Web. I feel that day will come soon with the social Semantic web, rather than pure Semantic Web technologies only. The social Semantic Web can be as common as the social web today if the social web community and the Semantic Web community work in cooperation.

Below are the links for the PDF and presentation slides.

paper

slides

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StYLiD wins with the vision of a future where ordinary people publish structured data

The Semantic Puzzle | And the winner is: The vision of a future where ordinary people publish structured data

Good news 🙂 The vision of StYLiD was selected as the winner in the Linked Data Vision competition organized by the Semantic Web company for the Linked Data Planet conference and expo. The announcement is online with nice appraisal.

I am thankful to the people who appreciated my thoughts and offered me such an honor. I hope this will really help in bringing my ideas to light, making the StYLiD application widely used by people for their own benefit and joining the global efforts to realize the Giant Global Graph.

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